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Grade Level Writing Expectations - Fifth Grade

Writes Clearly and Effectively

Ideas/Development

  • Writes clear, coherent explanations, instructions, and factual reports on a range of issues and topics
  • Expresses opinion or point of view with sufficient supporting information and appropriate emphasis

Organization

  • Works to develop an inviting introduction and a satisfying or thought-provoking ending with a logical and engaging middle
  • Links incidents, facts, and opinions logically and effectively through language, organization, and format
  • Creates impact through literary devices, organization, and word choice (e.g., alliteration, repetition)
  • Injects humor, tension, and/or mood into writing through word choice, varied sentence structure, and organizational techniques such as flashbacks

Voice

  • Writes with a clearly defined voice

Sentence Fluency

  • Injects humor, tension, and/or mood into writing through word choice, varied sentence structure, and organizational techniques such as flashbacks

Word Choice

  • Creates impact through literary devices, organization, and word choice (e.g., alliteration, repetition)
  • Uses formal, informal, and specialized vocabulary appropriate for audience and purpose
  • Injects humor, tension, and/or mood into writing through word choice, varied sentence structure, and organizational techniques such as flashbacks
  • Shows understanding of synonyms, antonyms, and some word origins and derivatives
Conventions
Spelling Capitalization Punctuation Grammar & Usage Sentences / Paragraphs
  • Correct spelling of grade-level words
  • Resources used to find correct spelling for words identified as misspelled
  • Uses a multi-strategy approach to spelling (e.g., visual patterns, sound patterns, rules, and meanings)
  • Brand names (e.g., Nike)
  • Correct capitalization of geographic regions (e.g., the West)
  • Correct use of quotation marks in dialogue, internal and external (e.g., "How's it going?" the boy asked.)
  • Commas to set off interjections (e.g., Okay, if you say so.) or explanatory phrases (e.g., They stood together, away from the pile of stones in the corner, and their jokes were quiet.)
  • Comma after date or address within text (e.g., Her birthday was June 1, 1993, when she was 23.)
  • Hyphen in numbers (e.g., twenty-three)
  • Hyphen to join numbers (e.g., The Mariners won, 17-6.)
  • Periods in abbreviations (e.g., pg., ft.)
  • Correct uses of ellipsis ( . . . ):
  • to show omitted words
  • to show a pause
  • Correct use of semicolon between two independent clauses
  • Resources to check punctuation
  • Correct use of subject vs. object pronouns (e.g., "I" vs. "me")
  • Resources to check usage
  • New paragraphs to change speakers in dialogue

 

Understands and Uses the Writing Process

Prewriting

  • Gathers information from a range of sources and uses an organizer to analyze, synthesize, select, and plan writing
  • Generates ideas independently and as a group member using a variety of pre-writing methods
  • Narrows the topic
  • Takes notes and gathers information from outside sources

Drafting

  • Reorganizes, if necessary, at all stages of writing
  • Maintains continuity of an idea in a single piece over time
  • When appropriate, writes multiple drafts

Sharing/Responding

  • Contributes to team effort to create, revise, edit, and evaluate writing
  • Offers specific feedback using
  • 6-trait and other scoring criteria

Revising

  • Revises by adding, deleting, reordering, or substituting

Editing

  • Edits to meet 5th grade standards of conventions
  • Understands and uses standard proofreading marks

Publishing

  • Presents polished product using legible text
  • Publishes work independently

Reflecting

  • Uses established, as well as own, criteria to reflect on quality and effort in writing
  • Studies the writing of established authors and identifies the authors' elements of style
  • Self reflects on pieces selected for portfolio

Addresses Audience, Purpose, and Form

  • Considers audience and purpose at all stages of the writing process
  • Includes cause and effect, opinions, and opposing points of view in persuasive writing
  • Determines emphasis by considering purpose and audience's probable interest and knowledge of topic
  • Incorporates knowledge of forms consistently and considers these when evaluating product
  • Writes in forms associated with specific tasks or careers (e.g., receipts, applications)

Suggested Text Forms

  Literature or Literary Forms Informational, Task-oriented, and/or Technical Writing
New to
Grade Level
  • Narrative essays
  • Business letter to complain, explain
  • Literary analyses (explain about setting)
  • Editorials
  • Interviews
  • Minutes
Previously
Introduced
  • Narrative: experiential stories
  • Narrative: fictional stories
  • Personal letters, cards, and notes
  • Diaries/journals
  • Recounts
  • Rhymes
  • Retellings
  • Poems: patterned poetry, couplet
  • Poems: free verse
  • Plays
  • Biographies and autobiographies
  • Tall tales
  • Comics
  • Personal essays
  • Labels
  • Captions
  • Informational sentence
  • Recounts
  • Answers to questions
  • Questions and answers
  • Instructions (explain how to)
  • Learning logs
  • Reports
  • Reviews
  • Posters
  • Directions (to a location)
  • Paraphrase
  • Expository writing (explain about)
  • Expository speeches (explain about)
  • Book reviews and reports
  • Brochures
  • Procedures (to a game, to make something)
  • Expository essays (explain why, compare/contrast)
  • Expository speeches (explain why)
  • Field notes
  • Newspaper and magazine articles
  • Summaries
  • Business letters to thank or to request
  • Letters to the editor
  • Memos
  • Literary analyses (explain about character, plot)